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FRUIT LOGISTICA Daily

All texts are for editorial use only. Photos are intended solely for editorial use (additional press photos are online). Any use for promotional purposes is forbidden. Publication free of charge (please credit “Messe Berlin”) - copy requested.

Quote of the Day

Quote of the Day

“The fruit and vegetable industry has always been able to adapt. In this business you are used to challenges. They are part of the DNA of the business. For us, Brexit is not a fight to the death, but an inconvenience, like a pothole in a street: you notice it – and go on as before.”

Chris White, Managing Director of the German-British company Fruitnet Media International

Stat of the Day

Stat of the Day

In 2018, the United Kingdom imported 6.5 million tonnes of fruit and vegetables in total, thus ranking second among the largest EU importers in this sector. In terms of vegetables, the UK, which is currently the eighth biggest producer in the EU, is rather more self-sufficient, producing 53 percent itself. The top 3 types of fruit most imported to the UK are avocados, blueberries and figs. Popular vegetables are, above all, peppers, garlic and sweet corn.

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Brexit, new borders and new markets

Brexit, new borders and new markets

Exhibitors from 90 countries and trade visitors from 130 countries: FRUIT LOGISTICA is becoming increasingly international. Armenia is celebrating its premier at the exhibition, while Serbia and Albania have more than doubled their exhibition space. Kosovo is exhibiting with its own stand for the first time. New trading relationships, customs tariffs and basic conditions are a huge topic at the trade fair, just as much as Brexit.

The fact that countries in Eastern Europe have increased their presence is also due to sanctions against Russia and Iran. Sales markets in the West are therefore gaining in importance. Armenia is at FRUIT LOGISTICA for the first time with Spayka, a producer of fresh produce and the largest logistics firm in the Caucasus. At the foot of Mount Ararat, Spayka grows tomatoes and cucumbers in a large complex of greenhouses that extends over 55 hectares. Armenia currently exports almost exclusively to Gulf and CIS states. “Currently only five percent of our exports go to the EU,” says Karen Baghdasaryan, vice president of Spayka, “We see huge potential for organic produce from the greenhouses and for processed products, such as juices and marinades.”

Brexit and its possible consequences are a key topic at the international exhibition. The UK is an important market for many EU countries. 84 percent of fruit consumed by the UK is imported as well as virtually half of all vegetables. Spain and the Netherlands are particularly important for vegetable imports. They supply two thirds of the demand to the United Kingdom. According to the European Statistics Handbook 2019, the UK imports fresh vegetables with a total value of over 4.5 billion euros, and vegetables valued at over 2.8 billion euros. By contrast, fruit exports total 305 million euros. This means that the UK is investing twenty times its own income in fresh fruit. Whatever comes out of Brexit, one thing is clear: it will have an enormous impact on logistics for fresh produce within Europe, the refrigeration industry and on European ports.

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Three Questions to ... Nicole Visbeen, Managing Director of DailyFresh Logistics, The Netherlands

Three Questions to...

Nicole Visbeen, Managing Director of DailyFresh Logistics, The Netherlands

How important is the UK for your company?

Very important: for 20 years, we have been exclusively supplying the UK from Belgium and Holland. Every day, we dispatch around 150 to 200 trailers to England, each carrying around 26 pallets.

What impact will Brexit have on your business?

I think there will be a deal, but that could take months. Initially, our export volume will probably reduce by 30 to 40 percent. But a hard Brexit would also mean less competition. At closed borders, registration would be required every time. There are not enough customs officers. Lead times would be around two days longer. That would be difficult for fresh produce, of course.

How are you preparing for Brexit?

We set up an English firm last month and changed all our IT systems. 80 of our trailers are now positioned in the UK, where 50 percent of our staff already work.

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Radar Retail

Just spotted at FRUIT LOGISTICA: new and extraordinary fruits and vegetables.

Radar Retail
The leaves of the Rosa del Veneto unfold like a rose. This radicchio is not as bitter as the common varieties, but just as firm. Due to its mild flavour, it is often eaten as a salad. Chefs in particular like using it in the presentation of dishes because of its unusual colour. They have popularised the pink radicchio beyond the borders of Europe, so that today it is exported as far as Korea.

LA ROSA di Queruli Paolo

Hall 2.2, Stand B-07

Contact: Modestina Queruli

T: +39 0429 784809

info@radicciolarosa.it

Radar Retail
The Indian bitter melon belongs to the pumpkin family and lives up to its name: it is very bitter. In many Asian countries it has been popular for centuries and is eaten raw or in curries. It is said to have a healing effect and is used for instance in Ayurvedic medicine. The fruit grows all year round in tropical parts of Asia, South America, Africa and the Caribbean.

Carvexco
Hall 26, Stand E-07
Contact: Serge Budhai
T: +31 (0) 650448779
serge@carvexco.com

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Future Lab

Wanted: Quality

Good quality is the number one argument when consumers decide where to shop, as determined by market research institute GfK (Society for Consumer Research). But taste doesn’t always match the external promise. “The industry has focused on meeting trade specifications while neglecting consumers’ needs for too long,” says Jelger de Vriend. The Co-Founder of Innovative Fresh presents the InQuality concept. Launched in Sweden in 2018, it combines supermarket quality control, staff training and management advice. “The aim is to exceed consumers’ quality expectations,” adds de Vriend.

“Revolutionizing fresh produce quality for consumers”

Friday, 8 February 2019

12:00 - 12:30 p.m.

Hall 26

Fresh Produce Forum

Focus on packaging

At around 220 kilograms per head, Germany is Europe’s leader in packaging waste. Packaging legislation (VerpackG) has been in force since 1 January 2019. It places an obligation on everyone who circulates filled packaging to take care of its return and disposal. Registration with the new “Lucid” packaging register is necessary to do this. More packaging should be recycled as a result. Kaasten Reh from Fruchthandel Magazin discusses the new law and its significance for the international fruit trade with Massimo Bellotti, international sales manager of the Groupe Guillin and Kim Cheng, managing director of the German Packaging Institute.

“The new packaging law – challenges and solutions”
Friday, 8 February 2019
11.00 a.m. - 12 noon
Halle B/CityCube Berlin

Logistics Hub

Brexit – What now?

The possibility of a hard Brexit presents significant challenges for the logistics sector. They are the subject of many events in the Logistics Hub on Friday morning. In a presentation, Robert Hardy from Oakland Invicta sets out the risks and solutions of the logistics sector for the shipping business in the fresh produce segment, should a hard Brexit occur. Moderator Alex von Stempel, Managing Director of Freshwater Logistics, digs deep to see if trade flows can be redirected, whether the growing logistics risks can be passed on to shippers in the long run in the form of higher prices, and to what extent Brexit can offer a carte blanche for international smuggling.

“The impact trade disputes on fresh produce logistics”

Friday, 8 February 2019

10:25 - 10:45 a.m.

Hall 26

Start-up Stage

Fresh ideas

On the new Start-up Stage, young firms introduce trend-setting solutions for the fruit and vegetable sector. In short, ten-minute presentations, they show how processes along the entire value-added chain can be optimised. The first section is devoted to farm technology and ranges from precision agriculture, through drone-assisted pest control and robot-controlled fruit harvesting, to the use of solar-powered pumps for irrigation. The second section deals with supply chain management, with start-ups revealing how digital technologies can help to ensure the quality of the harvest, guarantee transparency and traceability and optimise transport processes.

Start-up Stage
Friday, 8 February 2019
10:00 a.m. - 2:00 p.m.
Hall 9, Stand B-12/B-13

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Video of the Day

Video of the Day

FRUIT LOGISTICA is the world’s central platform for manufacturers and distributors in the fruit and vegetable industry. Exhibitors from Africa, Asia and Europe explain its significance for their own business in the video for day 2 of the international trade fair.

 

All videos and interviews at:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/FruitLogistica

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Imprint

Susanne Tschenisch
Global PR Manager

tschenisch@messe-berlin.de
T: +49 30 3038 2295

Messe Berlin GmbH
Messedamm 22
14055 Berlin

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